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ID number:843370
Author:
Evaluation:
Published: 17.10.2008.
Language: English
Level: College/University
Literature: n/a
References: Not used
Extract

George Bernard Shaw, an Irish writer lived in 19-th and 20-th centuries and had socialist beliefs which were rather popular these days. One of his most famous plays is “Pygmalion” which was written in 1913 when it was a difficult time in the world as it was going to change (and changed after the WWI). But is the play really influenced by Shaw’s political views and time when it was written or not?

If we look at the content of the play, it is rather similar to Shaw’s beliefs. One of the main ideas expressed is that a poor flower girl Eliza Doolittle wants to learn proper English language, the way it is spoken by higher class. It coincides with one of Shaw’s beliefs that women are to be integrated in the society. In the times when play was written women were not equal to men and just fought for their emancipation. Many of them were poor but they wanted to achieve more in life and fought. Eliza is also shown as a girl from a poor family (her father is a drunkard) but she wants to receive an opportunity to learn proper English and does not want to miss it. …

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