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ID number:556807
Author:
Evaluation:
Published: 19.04.2016.
Language: English
Level: College/University
Literature: 2 units
References: Used
Time period viewed: 2013.g. - 2014.g.
Table of contents
Nr. Chapter  Page.
  Visual programming language    1
  Definition    1
  Object-Oriented Languages    2
  Syntax    4
  Semantics    5
  Static semantics    5
  Dynamic semantics    6
  Type system    6
  List of references    8
Extract

Static semantics
The static semantics defines restrictions on the structure of valid texts that are hard or impossible to express in standard syntactic formalisms. For compiled languages, static semantics essentially include those semantic rules that can be checked at compile time. Examples include checking that every identifier is declared before it is used (in languages that require such declarations) or that the labels on the arms of a case statement are distinct. Many important restrictions of this type, like checking that identifiers are used in the appropriate context (e.g. not adding an integer to a function name), or that subroutine calls have the appropriate number and type of arguments, can be enforced by defining them as rules in a logic called a type system. Other forms of static analyses like data flow analysis may also be part of static semantics. Newer programming languages like Java and C# have definite assignment analysis, a form of data flow analysis, as part of their static semantics.[1]

Dynamic semantics
Once data has been specified, the machine must be instructed to perform operations on the data. For example, the semantics may define the strategy by which expressions are evaluated to values, or the manner in which control structures conditionally execute statements. The dynamic semantics (also known as execution semantics) of a language defines how and when the various constructs of a language should produce a program behavior. There are many ways of defining execution semantics. …

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